Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

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ScottyBrockway72
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Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

Post by ScottyBrockway72 » Sun Jun 28, 2020 10:13 pm

I checked through the forum, and never came up with a working solution for this myself. I've seen Evapo-Rust mentioned, does this work and is it safe on chrome saddles and base plates that have gotten a bit rusty? I assume it's fine for the screws and block inserts made of mild steel. I've also seen people say to soak in WD40 or breakfree, which never worked for me. I've also seen a video saying 3in1 oil, which I haven't tried but I have tried mineral oil and mineral spirits both, neither of which works for saddles.

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sixstring
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Re: Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

Post by sixstring » Mon Jun 29, 2020 6:45 am

WD40 works. The worse the rust, the longer the soak.
But let's face it, someone buys a Kramer b/c it has a Floyd.

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PacerMedic
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Re: Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

Post by PacerMedic » Mon Jun 29, 2020 7:25 am

Ballistol if you can stand the smell. Some people love it, some don't.
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_xxx_
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Re: Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

Post by _xxx_ » Mon Jun 29, 2020 7:35 am

Before you go with WD40, try some strong dish washing fluid. It dissolves fat and gunk much better. Two spoons of that and some warm water, then stir well and let the saddles sit in there for a few hours. If there is still rust, you can repeat the treatment with WD40.

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2112
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Re: Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

Post by 2112 » Mon Jun 29, 2020 1:04 pm

I usually mix wd-40 and PB Blaster. Never thought of Ballistol. Been using it on my guns for years. I'll have to try it.

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SWANTECH
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Re: Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

Post by SWANTECH » Mon Jun 29, 2020 1:37 pm

For freeing up stuck parts PB Blaster.
For removing rust, use Evapo Rust.
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ScottyBrockway72
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Re: Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

Post by ScottyBrockway72 » Mon Jun 29, 2020 4:54 pm

Thanks all.

I'm going to try PB-Blaster, as I think it's more just gunk in there and not rust.

I bought some Evapo-Rust and that did an amazing job on the mild steel parts.

I have soaked stuff in WD-40 before, and it just never worked that well, also it makes stuff get gummy faster later as its hard to remove it all without some other solvent.

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PacerMedic
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Re: Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

Post by PacerMedic » Mon Jun 29, 2020 5:17 pm

Heat's worth a try. If you have a 100 watt iron, you might try zapping the bolts from the underside of the baseplate.
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ScottyBrockway72
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Re: Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

Post by ScottyBrockway72 » Tue Jun 30, 2020 12:28 am

They aren't completely frozen, just really stiff from years of sweat I assume. It's one I bought years ago that I'm rebuilding for my Washburn A-20V. I'm gonna pick some up from the auto parts store tomorrow.

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2112
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Re: Freeing up frozen Floyd Saddles question

Post by 2112 » Tue Jun 30, 2020 1:03 am

I take the saddles, soak them, then take the long saddle block screws, and clean them up on the brass wire wheel on my bench grinder. That makes them work smooth as silk. If a retaining block doesn’t easily fall out, it’s cracked or split. They can be a major bitch to get out. I drill a hole in a block of wood, set the saddle over it, and use a punch and a small plastic hammer and tap it out the bottom. Those little brass retaining squares click right back in. I keep a bunch of those little blocks on hand. More times than not, they’re cracked.

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